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Providing you with information on the IT and Digital marketplace.


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Why didn't I get the job? What was I missing? What do I need to do for next time? These are all valid questions to ask the company you have been interviewing for.

There is nothing more difficult after being rejected for a job than to find the confidence to phone the interviewer and ask WHY? You were so excited, felt the interview went great, what happened? You were enthusiastic and really wanted to work for this company and this group. What happened? You won't ever find out if you don't pick up the phone and ask.

First thing you need to do is be honest with yourself.  

Would you have taken the job if it was offered?  

Were you as qualified as you thought?

Did you have as good an interview as you thought?

Was there anything you said, or did that might have produced a negative impact in the interview?

​If you answered all of these positively then there is no harm in trying to get some feedback.

Did you get the interview through a recruiter or directly with the company? If you worked through a recruiter, than your first phone call is to him/her.

Recruiters

You have a much better chance of getting constructive feedback from your Recruiter. They are like your agent and there is nothing they want more than for you to get the position. The recruiter also wants to fill this job in the future so they want to know exactly what the company is looking for so they will be asking the company what my Candidate was missing.

Keep in mind that a Company isn't going to want to tell you or the recruiter much more than "your candidate didn't have enough experience in ....". The interviewers are employees of the organization and they owe a fiduciary duty to their employer. This means they will be very careful about what they say. The last thing they want to worry about is a lawsuit because they said something about your personality or age or sex.

Wait a few days if calling the Company directly.

Don't call right away, wait a few days. Call the interviewer you seemed to have the best rapport with. Re-introduce yourself, be positive.  

I wanted to thank you personally for interviewing me. 

I love your Company and was wondering what I could do to improve my chances for the next time.  

Is there anything that I did that prevented me from getting the job?

Are there other positions coming up that would be more suited to my experience and skills?

If you want truthful constructive criticism, then you have to be willing to listen. And don't get defensive. The Interviewer doesn't want a confrontation and you aren't going to change their mind. Getting defensive will only reinforce the fact that they made the right decision and there go your chances for a future chance. Ask specific questions:

Were my answers too short?

Did I seem confident when I answered your questions?

Was I too relaxed or too stressed looking?

What could I do to come across more effectively in the future?

What was the one thing I did best?

What could I improve on?

If it was a skill or experience, then these are things you are going to have to improve with education or more time in a junior position. Cultivate a positive relationship with the Interviewer, let him/her know that you are going to work on their recommendations and would love a chance to keep in touch about future opportunities.  

Do Mock-up Interviews

Ask your recruiter or a career coach, or at least a friend to take the interview questions and do a mock-up interview with you. Treat it like a real interview. You want to be relaxed in an interview but also hungry. Being too relaxed in an interview can come across as arrogant, being too hungry can come across as too aggressive. Finding that happy medium is very difficult, especially if it is a job you really want. If you were trying out for a hockey team you would be out there shooting pucks every day. So why not practice for an interview?

Look at the positive

You got an interview, maybe even a 2nd and 3rd. Wow - you know how many people applied for these positions. Your resume got you in the door., that's the hardest part. Take the constructive criticism and wow them the next time!


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Reading the story from Staffing Industry Analysts today brought my morning smile. I thought I would extract the opening paragraph from Planet's "How to take an Interview" as the Do's and contrast with some of the actual Don'ts.

DO’S: Received from -- "Planet Interviewing Handbook"

“You have to sell yourself in an interview!”

You hear this directive all the time from people who are willing to give you free interviewing advice. However, the statement is virtually never followed up with instructions on exactly how you should be doing the selling. The purpose of this guide is to fill this gap by giving you concrete, specific actions that you can take to sell yourself. It is not the intent of this guide to turn you into a professional salesperson. Instead, it is meant to introduce you to only those basic selling skills that will be the most helpful to you and have the greatest positive impact as you interview for the next step in your career. So, don’t become stressed or discouraged if you don’t think you could succeed in sales. You are not trying to become a salesperson. You just want to be better at selling yourself than others interviewing for the same position. Before I get into the meat of the subject, let’s pause and think about the implications of the advice to sell yourself. In my opinion, the statement implies that:

1. You have to know your product thoroughly, and you are the product.

2. You have to prepare yourself for each interview in exactly the same way as a salesperson would, which is:

• You have to polish your interviewing skills.

• You have to plan for each interview just as salespeople plan for sales calls.

3. You have to think and act in the interview as a salesperson would, that is:

• You have to control the interview through the skilled use of questioning techniques. An interview is not simply an oral exam where you passively answer questions that test your knowledge.

• You have to close before you leave;

DON’TS:  Received from -- "Staffing Industry Analysts" e-news@staffingindustry.com

TAKING PHONE CALLS, BEING INTOXICATED AND OTHER JOB INTERVIEW DON’TS - July 11, 2019

From taking phone calls during job interviews to showing up under the influence of drugs, Express Employment Professionals surveyed business leaders and job seekers about the most inappropriate activities they have seen during job interviews. In one case, a candidate grabbed a doughnut without asking then proceeded to eat it during the interview; another job seeker arrived wearing bunny slippers.

Here’s what the business leaders said they have seen while interviewing candidates:

85% report a job candidate “showing up late.”

83% report a job candidate with “inappropriate clothing.”

49% report a job candidate with “inappropriate language.”

48% report a job candidate “eating or chewing gum.”

39% report a job candidate “responding to text messages.”

37% report a job candidate “answering a phone call.”

31% report a job candidate “bringing a child into the interview.”

31% report a job candidate “bringing a friend into the interview.”

26% report a job candidate “bringing a parent into the interview.”

24% report a job candidate being “under the influence” of drugs or alcohol.

“Aggressive pushback is usually the most shocking,” said Janis Petrini, an Express franchise owner in Grand Rapids, Michigan. In response to a question about job history, Petrini said one job candidate said it was “none of your business.” She saw another candidate “use his phone from the moment he sat at the desk until the moment he walked out of the door. He took several phone calls, a video chat and posted to his social media — and then proceeded to rush through the rest of the interview process.”

Mike Brady, franchise owner of the Jacksonville West office in Florida, said not only did an applicant take a phone call, the applicant “even held up a finger telling me to wait.”

Job candidates reported inappropriate behavior by their interviewers as well:

63% report an interviewer “showing up late.”

58% report having an interviewer with a “lack of preparation.”

51% report an interviewer “answering a phone call.”

39% report an interviewer “oversharing.”

30% report an interviewer “asking discriminatory questions.”

28% report an interviewer “wearing inappropriate clothing.”

An interview is an opportunity for a candidate to showcase his or her full potential, candidates who show they don’t care likely won’t get the job, Express CEO Bill Stoller said. But interviewers also need to be self-aware.

“In this tight labor market, the smallest thing could turn off a qualified candidate, and that’s not something you can afford,” Stoller said. The report was based on a survey of 310 business leaders and 212 job seekers.


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"Employment references are professionals who can comment on your personal character, work ethic, past work experiences and abilities to perform specific duties."

It's important to have your references prepped and ready to go as you move into the job hunting, career change stage of your life. Being given a job offer and then scampering around trying to find appropriate references and their contact information won't give a good impression to your new bosses. You don't have to hand in your references until you are asked for them which is usually at the verbal job offer stage, but they should be all ready to go.  

"Almost 60% of employers claim that they have had to withdraw an offer of employment after receiving poor references about successful applicants. " - monster.com

Who to Use for Your Professional Reference?

The first choice would always be your current supervisor. This is an easy choice if your partner has just been transferred to another city and you are relocating. A little more difficult if you are looking for a new job because you want a change, specifically of boss. Your reference doesn't have to be a "manager", it could be a more "senior" co-worker who is working with you on your current project. If your reference is from a previous position then a supervisor/manager would be the best choice.  

Start off by making a list of people you have worked with in the past and had a good relationship with. List the projects you worked on that were completed successfully and who your supervisor and co-workers were. Check out your previous performance reviews, which supervisors were complimentary towards you. If there are individuals on this list who can also relate to the new position you are applying for - great.  

Get Back in Touch

Thank goodness for LinkedIn, it has made keeping in touch with previous co-workers much easier. But finding them on LinkedIn isn't enough. You need to actually call these individuals and ask them if they remember you and if they will give you a reference. If you have lost touch, you want to reconnect and build your relationship back up.  

When you are talking to them explain the position you are applying for. Reconnect about old projects you worked on together. Give them a heads up when you get to the job offer stage, so they can be expecting the call. We all deal with telemarketers and the last thing you want is your reference thinking your potential employer is a telemarketer and hanging up on them.  

Include on your list their name, company, position and a day and night time contact number. Ask them if there is a time preference for receiving a phone call. This list should look professional, a white clean 8 x 11 piece of paper, not names on little post-its.

Prepare Your References with What Information Can Be Provided About You 

References will be called so make sure they are prepared. Large companies use reference services to do their reference checks. Companies who use Recruiters will sometimes have the recruiting company do the reference checks or the actual hiring managers will call. Either way there are only certain things they can ask in a reference check. Make sure your reference is going to give you glowing comments about the following questions:

  • Length of employment?
  • Previous job title?
  • Brief details of responsibility?
  • Overall performance?
  • Time-keeping and attendance?
  • Reason for leaving?
  • Would you re-hire this employee?
  • Keep in Touch

Follow up with your references after you start your job with a big thank you and remember to stay in touch. You never know when you may need a reference again. Or you may want to go and work for them in the future.  

Keep Your Reference List Up to Date

New references from your most current jobs, volunteer or community experience should keep getting added to your reference list with up-to-date contact information. But that doesn't mean you lose track of your older references. Network, Network, Network! You never know when you may be able to help someone from your past or they may be able to help you.


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You've just walked out of your first, second or third interview. This is a good time to grab a coffee and take 15 minutes to make some notes from the interview.

  • What the people were like? Write a couple of points on the back of their business cards (which you remembered to ask for).
  • How did you do?
  • Any questions you forgot to ask?
  • Why you still want the job?
  • Why you are the right person for the job?

Later that same day, sit down and compose your Thank You email. Remember, if you were interviewed by a panel then you want to send a personalized email to each person. Your Thank You should be sent out within 48 hours.

Why?

You want them to read the email and remember you. And there’s no point in sending out an email after they have made their decision.

Your email should be formal, starting with, "Dear Person's Name" and ending with, "Sincerely Your Name, Contact Info".

The body of your email should be 3 or 4 paragraphs (4 maximum).

First paragraph will be a general thank you for meeting you and what a pleasure it was to learn more about your company, etc.

Second paragraph will reiterate your skills and why you now feel like this is the job for you.

Third paragraph – “I'm looking forward to hearing from you at my number/email below.”


A few final things:

  • Keep it short, sweet and positive.
  • Proofread, proofread, proofread!

 

And the last thing to do - cross your fingers and wait for your job offer!


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During the interview not only does the company find out about you, this is also your opportunity to find out if this is a job, position, and company that you really want to work for. Engaging with your interviewer is the first step in forming a relationship with him/her. Starting with a smile and a firm handshake and keeping upbeat during the interview process are all the basics needed for a successful interview.

THE COMPANY NEEDS YOU

You are being interviewed because the company has a need for someone with your qualifications. Answering the interviewer's questions precisely and confidently will help put you in the driver's seat. You have the qualifications. It's important to remember that an interview shouldn't be an interrogation, if it feels like that, you need to quickly try and turn it back into a conversation between 2 people who have the same goal - filling a position in the company.

ARE YOU INTERESTED IN THE POSITION?

The next step in the process is to show them that you are interested in the position and the company. Researching the company is always the first step before your interview. (Truthfully it should be the first step before you send in your resume.) Making a list of questions to ask during the interview process is all part of the preparation. The answers to some of these questions will come up as a natural part of the interview process. Now it is your turn to ask specific questions. Don't stall the interview by asking questions just for the sake of asking a question. Make sure your questions are going to help further your relationship with the interviewer. They need to be engaging and smart. Do not ask a question that is answered on the company webpage, this shows you didn't do your research. Try not to repeat questions that have already been answered. Break your list into 2 parts, questions likely to be answered during the interview and questions more likely to wait until the end.

QUESTIONS LIKELY TO BE ANSWERED DURING THE INTERVIEW

  • What would a typical day be like for the person in this role? Do different time frames affect the position? ie does the job vary at month/quarter end?
  • What is the most challenging part of this position?
  • What are your future plans for this position?
  • Is this a replacement for someone or a new position? If a replacement, was the employee promoted, transferred or left the company?
  • Is there travel involved?
  • Will I be on call? How often?
  • Who is my direct report? How many members are on the team?

QUESTIONS TO END THE INTERVIEW ON

  • What is the chance of advancement for this position? Does the company like to promote from within?
  • Is there training/education possibilities?
  • Are there team and company events?  
  • What do you like most about working for this company?
  • Are there performance reviews? How frequently?
  • What is the start date for this position?
  • What are the next steps in the interview process and when should I hope to hear from you?
  • Is there anything else I can provide you with?

QUESTIONS NOT TO ASK

Yes, surprisingly, there are questions you shouldn't ask during the interview - especially the first one below. These questions should be saved for the negotiation stage or discussed with your recruiter before hand.  

  • What is the salary?
  • How do yearly bonuses and performance raises work?
  • How much vacation would I get and when can I start taking it?
  • What are the benefits?


Interviews are stressful. Being prepared is the first step towards relieving some of your stress and anxiety levels. When you smile your whole body relaxes and smiling is contagious, so start the interview with your smile and a handshake and end it the same way with an added Thank You to all the interviewers.